Counterfeit goods in South-East Asia: Saving money may risk your health

Facts and trends

Over recent decades, counterfeiting has been causing serious harm, not only to the global economy but also to consumer health and safety. The huge, quickly generated profits made from illicit trading (comprising counterfeiting activities) has encouraged counterfeiters to find new ways to evade the detection and restriction of their illegal activities and to speedily adapt to changing circumstances. Booming e-commerce, the intensive use of social media platforms and most recently, the Covid-19 pandemic, have all driven the counterfeiting issue to become a critical concern.

Photo source: www.pexels.com

Photo source: www.pexels.com

In a report published in 2019 by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and the European Union Intellectual Property Office (EUIPO)[1],  half of countries in South-East Asia (SEA), such as Singapore, Thailand, Malaysia, the Philippines and Vietnam, are listed among the top 25 economies for the provenance of counterfeit and pirated goods between 2014 and 2016. In this article, we will take a look at how counterfeit trading activities are evolving in SEA as well as the explicit and implicit consequences on human health of using counterfeit products.

In many areas in the world, including the South-East Asian region, the Covid-19 outbreak has caused the authorities to apply strict restriction measures, such as lockdowns, social distancing, working from home, etc. During the crisis, online shopping has become an efficient way to fulfil people’s need. E-commerce platforms, including Shopee, Lazada and Tokopedia, or social media platforms, such as Facebook, TikTok and Instagram, are popular places where people make millions of orders every day. A joint e-Conomy report in 2020 by Google, Temasek and Bain emphasised significant changes in the digital life of the region: 36% of digital consumers were new to the online services due to Covid-19 and 94% of them intend to continue using digital services going forward[2].

Moreover, the Covid-19 crisis caused a sharp slowdown in the 2020 GDP growth of major countries such as Indonesia (-2.1%), Malaysia (-5.6%), Myanmar (-10%), the Philippines (-9.6%), Singapore (-5.4%) and Thailand (-6.1%)[3]. Given the current environment of uncertainty and fear, and the real threat of significant declines in income, many consumers are now unable to purchase branded goods and services. Consequently, buying cheap counterfeit products is a tempting option for consumers with low budgets.

Amid the chaos, counterfeiters have promptly taken advantage of the new situation and, unfortunately, they are often one step ahead of authorities and policy. Recently, an overwhelming number of counterfeits being sold on e-commerce sites, social media platforms and dark-net markets have been detected, warned about, and reported by authorities, brand owners and consumers.

IEO-charts-IPV-Reports-as-of-Sept-2020_stFor instance, according to the IP Violation Reports from the Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHL), from January to September 2020, IP complaints lodged at the IPOPHL increased to 135, surpassing the total of 129 complaints received in the previous 5 years (from 2015 to 2019)[4]. Among those, the majority of violators were operating online.

In 2020, the General Department of Market Surveillance in Vietnam checked more than 5 000 suspected cases, uncovering about 4 500 violations. This resulted in monetary fines that came to a total of VND 30 billion (approximately USD 1.3 million). The value of counterfeit goods, and goods without a certificate of origin infringing IP rights, recorded in the first 7 months of 2020 by this department was VND 40 billion (approximately USD 1.74 million)[5].

Furthermore, according to the enforcement statistics of the Department of Special Investigation and Customs, Royal Thai Police, the number of seized items from January to May 2021 increased by 83.33% compared to the same period last year[6].

More importantly, the Covid-19 pandemic has made people seriously anxious about getting sick. Many people stockpiled medicines, testing kits, and protective equipment (such as face masks, medical devices, disinfectants, sanitisers, etc.), causing a dramatic surge in demand for those products. During the peak crisis, global transportation was seriously affected, resulting in higher prices for raw materials. There were not enough products originating from genuine sources to meet the huge spike in demand. Consequently, broken supply chains, a strong demand for essential products, and the high level anxiety among consumers, have accelerated the surge in illicit trade and counterfeiting. ‘When the supply does not meet the demand, it creates an environment where poorer quality or fake medicines will try to meet that demand,’ said Pernette Bourdillion Esteve from the World Health Organization (WHO)[7].

A report by Check Point Research[8] revealed that there has been an alarming increase of fake Covid-19 vaccines available on the dark web since November 2020 – when the positive news about vaccine trials and the imminent availability of vaccines was released. Phrases such as ‘available corona virus vaccine $250’, ‘Say bye bye to COVID19=CHLOROQUINE PHOSPHATE’ and ‘Buy fast. CORONA-VIRUS VACCINE IS OUT NOW’ were used to tempt people into buying fake medicines. Check Point’s expert also noticed that a dark-net search for Covid-19 returned multiple results, including hundreds of advertisements – an increase of over 400% since early December 2020.

Photo source: INTERPOL

Photo source: INTERPOL

Recently, INTERPOL (with the support of local police, customs and health regulatory authorities) carried out Operation Pangea XIV in 92 countries, targeting the sale of counterfeit and illicit medicines and medical products. The operation resulted in 113 020 web links, including websites and online market places, being closed down or removed. This Operation oversaw the seizure of 9 million medical devices and illicit pharmaceuticals (fake and unauthorised Covid-19 testing kits accounted for more than half of those) and 277 arrests worldwide during one week of action (18–25 May 2021). The potentially dangerous pharmaceuticals seized during the operation had an estimated value of more than USD 23 million[9].

The health and safety consequences of counterfeits

Using counterfeit products, especially fake medicines, can cause serious harm to health and safety for consumers, as they are more likely to contain dangerous ingredients than authentic goods. Furthermore, counterfeit products usually do not go through the required consumer compliance and safety tests before being put on the market.

Recently, some alarming figures related to counterfeiting were released in the EUIPO’s Qualitative Study on Risks Posed by Counterfeits to Consumers[10]. This study clearly displays the extent of the dangers to health posed by counterfeit goods, as evidenced by the alerts submitted by EU market surveillance authorities (MSAs) using the European Commission’s ‘Rapid Alert System for dangerous non-food products’ (RAPEX system). The report concentrates on the seven most common risks reported: chemical, injuries, strangulation, choking, electric shock, damage to hearing and fires.

An analysis of RAPEX alerts carried out from 2010 to 2017 pointed out that:

  • A total of 97% of the dangerous counterfeit goods recorded were assessed as posing a serious risk.
  • Toys are the most popular type of product, followed by clothing, textiles and fashion items. In fact, the end-users of 80% of the goods reported as being dangerous and counterfeit (toys, childcare items and children’s clothing) were children. The most common danger reported (32%) was related to exposure to hazardous chemicals and toxins that could cause acute or long-term health issues (from both immediate or long-term exposure).
  • A total of 24% of the dangerous products recorded as counterfeit posed more than one danger to users.
  • The causes of the risks identified ranged from poorly constructed products or the use of inferior supplies and components, to a lack of understanding of regulations or safety mechanisms.

With counterfeit medicines, the impact can even be life-threatening. According to a WHO study on public health and the socioeconomic impact of substandard and falsified medical products[11], many counterfeit drugs contain undeclared active ingredients that might have serious unwanted health consequences. These can pose very serious threats to consumer health and public systems, such as:

  • adverse effects (for example toxicity or lack of efficacy) from incorrect active ingredients;
  • failure to cure or prevent future disease, thereby increasing mortality, morbidity and the prevalence of disease;
  • contributing to the progression of antimicrobial resistance and drug-resistant infections;
  • a loss of confidence in health-care professionals, health programmes and health systems;
  • an increase in individual and health system spending on health care;
  • lost income due to prolonged illness or death;
  • lost productivity costs to patients and households when seeking additional medical care, the effects of which are felt by businesses and the wider economy, etc.
Photo source: www.pexels.com

Photo source: www.pexels.com

According to the report from the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), many South-East Asian people are at risk as the amount spent by consumers in this region on falsified medicines is estimated to range between USD 520 million and USD 2.6 billion per year[12]. The report also pointed out that ‘some of the falsified medicines manufactured in South-East Asia involve mainstream companies that cut corners by deliberately diluting products with substitute or cheaper chemicals or by altering the expiration dates on packaging. Others are produced as the result of insufficient mixing, contamination and degradation, and other simple sloppiness, as evidenced by some samples containing more than the specified dose’. For example, during Interpol’s Operation Pangea VIII in 2015, Indonesian authorities detected that criminals were altering the expiry date or the amount of the active ingredient on packages of counterfeit, expired and unregistered medicines at the warehouse and returning them to pharmacies for sale. Other follow-up investigations in Indonesia uncovered counterfeits in 37 medical facilities across 9 provinces, including counterfeit imported child vaccines for hepatitis B, tetanus, measles and polio. More than 20 individuals, including 3 health professionals, were arrested due to their involvement in these illegal operations[13].

Illegal trading and counterfeiting have negative consequences, not only for the economy (decrease of revenue and profits, erosion of brand confidence and reputation) but also for consumer health and safety. The boom of e-commerce and the extensive use of social media platforms, along with the recent Covid-19 outbreak, have been creating fertile ground for the production, distribution, and consumption of counterfeit products. To tackle this threat, continuous actions, efforts, and financial resources are required from the authorities, agencies, and IP owners to track, monitor and stop the illegal activities of counterfeiters.

But above all else, it is the responsibility of the consumer to adopt a wise attitude and to avoid buying and using counterfeit products. Purchasing counterfeit goods may instantly save some money, but paying with our health means a higher cost for all of us.

The South-East Asia IP SME Helpdesk developed and published a Guide on How to Remove Counterfeit Goods from e-commerce Sites in South-East Asia (link here), an E-commerce Infographic (link here) and IP Country Factsheets (link here).

For more information about IP in South-East Asia, check out our website at https://intellectual-property-helpdesk.ec.europa.eu/regional-helpdesks/south-east-asia-ip-sme-helpdesk_en.

The South-East Asia IP SME Helpdesk is an EU initiative that provides free, practical IP advice to European SMEs in relation to SEA. EU companies can send questions to question@southeastasia-iprhelpdesk.eu and will receive replies within 3 working days.

Author: Xuan Nguyen, SEA IP SME Helpdesk

LOGO LA IP SME HD_EC ENE-21 lr

[1] https://www.oecd-ilibrary.org/docserver/g2g9f533-en.pdf?expires=1617871694&id=id&accname=guest&checksum=5A2965E4B201677AA07AB112CEE181F9

[2] https://www.bain.com/globalassets/noindex/2020/e_conomy_sea_2020_report.pdf

[3] https://data.worldbank.org/indicator/NY.GDP.MKTP.KD.ZG

[4] https://www.ipophil.gov.ph/news/jan-sept-2020-reports-complaints-on-ip-infringement-surpasses-2015-2019-total/

[5] https://vir.com.vn/preventing-counterfeit-during-explosive-e-commerce-growth-during-pandemic-84285.html

[6] http://www.ipthailand.go.th/en/ipr-enforcement-operation/item/total2021.html

[7] https://www.bbc.com/news/health-52201077

[8] https://blog.checkpoint.com/2020/12/11/covid-19-vaccines-touted-for-just-250-on-darknet/

[9] https://www.interpol.int/en/News-and-Events/News/2021/Thousands-of-fake-online-pharmacies-shut-down-in-INTERPOL-operation

[10] https://euipo.europa.eu/tunnel-web/secure/webdav/guest/document_library/observatory/documents/reports/2019_Risks_Posed_by_Counterfeits_to_Consumers_Study/2019_Risks_Posed_by_Counterfeits_to_Consumers_Study.pdf

[11] https://www.who.int/medicines/regulation/ssffc/publications/SE-Study_EN_web.pdf?ua=1

[12] https://www.unodc.org/documents/southeastasiaandpacific/Publications/2019/SEA_TOCTA_2019_web.pdf

[13] Ibid.

 

Trade mark search: Why it is important and how to conduct it properly

WRITTEN BY XUAN NGUYEN

Trade marks (brands) represent one of the principal assets of a company. Trade mark is crucial to your success because it allows clients and consumers to easily identify and find products and services. Protection comes with a price, and startups and SMEs often have limited budgets. However, in the digital economy, trade mark protection is well worth the investment. It secures legal certainty and prevents others from illegally copying or using your mark to take advantage of your reputation. Strong trade mark protection enables you to stay competitive and nurture a safe environment for thriving cross-border expansion.

search-2951638_1920(Photo source: https://pixabay.com/)

Trade mark searches are an integral part of any trade mark protection strategy, but many companies do not routinely perform them or do not do so thoroughly enough. In this article we will provide you with a full rundown of the importance of trade mark searches and how to effectively conduct them.

1. Why are trade mark searches needed?

A pre-filing trade mark search

By finding out what other trade marks are out there, you will learn whether there is room for the trade mark you want to protect. A pre-filing trade mark search allows you see if there are any pre-registered/pre-filed trade marks that are identical or significantly similar to yours (which may lead to their registration being refused). If the search results reveal the existence of trade marks that are likely to block your trade mark registration, at least you have a hint before taking further steps, for example by changing the proposed trade mark or removing prior trade marks if feasible (this may be achieved via amicable negotiations or by cancellation actions, which are usually attempted with the support of a trade mark expert). As a result, these searches will help businesses to avoid wasting significant time and resources preparing and filing an application for a trade mark that may not be available for registration.

Watch out for potential infringements

Owning a registered trade mark does not automatically guarantee that someone else do not use it, or register a similar trade mark. Regular trade mark monitoring is highly recommended, as it can result in the early detection of potential infringements such as counterfeits, copycats, bad faith registrations, etc.

In practice, copycats usually operate in the same industry as the trade mark holder; by using your marks they can easily mislead consumers about the quality and origin of their products and services. Consequences can include damaging your reputation, decreasing your revenue and preventing your expansion plans. The early detection of infringement allows you to quickly initiate a proper solution to stop or mitigate the violations and to notify your clients in a timely fashion, thereby avoiding brand dilution or misleading messages.stop-634941_1920

(Photo source: https://pixabay.com/)

Moreover, trade mark protection is territorial: protection exists only in the country where you have registered your trade mark. Developing an efficient brand protection plan for cross-border markets has been seen as a big challenge for many businesses, especially SMEs. In fact, like many other countries, most South-East Asian countries apply the first to file principle for trade mark protection, which gives priority to those who first file an application to register the trade mark. This rule, unfortunately, opens the door for bad-faith registration practices i.e., a third party (a trade mark squatter, local company or any other party) intentionally files a trade mark application in a particular country before the trade mark owner to become a legal owner of the trade mark. By successfully registering your trade mark, they can take advantage of your successful business for commercial gain in your target market – this can have various consequences, from damaging your reputation to excluding you from the market. However, after a trade mark filing, intellectual property (IP) offices will usually publish the trade mark application for public inspection for a specific period of time, to allow third parties to file an opposition (for example, oppositions can be filed in Cambodia within 90 days, in Singapore within 2 months and in the Philippines within 30 days of the publication date). Detecting bad faith registrations promptly allows you to react in a timely fashion.

2. Where to search?

There are many sources that a brand owner can use to run a trade mark search. Some suggestions are detailed below.

a) Trade mark databases

Global Brand Database 

The Global Brand Database, administered by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), automatically uploads trade mark records sent by national, regional and international collections – for example from Madrid – The International Trademark System (details of database content sources here).

Through the Global Brand Database, you can:

  • conduct a search to cover multiple sources simultaneously in a large number of countries;
  • search by text, class, goods or services, holder names, countries and even images (using AI search-by-image filter functions).Screenshot 2021-07-01 13.29.51

National trade mark databases

Although the Global Brand Database covers a large number of trade mark collections, it depends on how often national offices communicate updated information to the WIPO. Also, some national databases are not available on the Global Brand Database, Myanmar is one example. Therefore, it is also advisable to run simultaneous and additional searches in the database of your target national IP office to get the latest updates on applications that have been filed/registered.

In South-East Asia, SingaporeVietnamIndonesiaMalaysiathe PhilippinesBruneiLaos and Cambodia are the countries in which trade mark databases are available in English.

b) The internet, e-commerce platforms and social media networks

A comprehensive trade mark search should not only review trade mark databases, it should also detect unregistered marks that are being used by third parties on the market and may be infringing your trade mark rights. Conducting searches of multiple sources that counterfeiters, copycats and other criminals may be using to take advantage of your marks is always recommended. Searches should be conducted on the internet, e-commerce platforms and prevailing social media networks.

pexels-photomix-company-230544

(Photo source: https://www.pexels.com/)

With over 87% of the search market share, Google is a dominant search engine worldwide and its share is even higher in South-East Asia (over 90% for most countries in the region)[1]. Conducting a Google search can take you to numerous websites, links, apps and networks that may contain signs of potential infringement. The Covid-19 crisis is accelerating the already thriving digitalisation process, driving more and more businesses and consumers online. Amid this overwhelming wave of online activity, e-commerce platforms have become vital market places to fulfill people’s needs. In South-East Asian countries, Shopee, Lazada, Tokopedia, Bukalapak, Tiki, etc. are the most-visited e-commerce sites[2] where you can find various types of fake products in different price ranges. Using social media networks such as Facebook, Instagram or TikTok in order to reach out to consumers and sell counterfeits is also quite common in the region.

3. Conclusion

Some popular methods that businesses can use to run trade mark searches have been outlined above. However, consulting a trade mark specialist to obtain better search results and practical advice is usually recommended. Comprehensive trade mark searches should take various factors into account. As well as names, key words and images, translations and national phonetic variations of the search terms should be included. Many South-East Asian countries, such as Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Indonesia, and Myanmar, have their own alphabets, which do not use Roman characters. Using a local specialist to help with trade mark searches is advisable, as they will maximise the search effectiveness by avoiding any gaps.

Moreover, when the results come in, expertise is required in order to carry out a proper analysis. For example, when considering the likelihood of identical or similar marks being confused with one another, an experienced trade mark specialist will know how to assess the situation by properly reviewing the similarity of the products and services that the marks are being used for. They can provide you with a practical assessment of the likely success of your registration application or if you will be able to take actions against potential infringements.

Trade mark searches are vital for your brand protection strategy, especially in the fast-paced digital economy. Being well informed will save you a huge amount of time and resources, and secure a safe way for your business to grow and thrive.

The SEA IP SME Helpdesk developed and published a Guide to Trade Mark protection in South-East Asia (here) and How to Remove Counterfeit Goods from e-commerce Sites in South-East Asia (here).

For more information about IP in SEA, check out our website at https://intellectual-property-helpdesk.ec.europa.eu/regional-helpdesks/south-east-asia-ip-sme-helpdesk_en.

The SEA IP SME Helpdesk is an EU initiative that provides free, practical IP advice to European SMEs in South-East Asia. EU companies can send questions to question@southeastasia-iprhelpdesk.eu and will receive a reply within 3 working days.

[1] https://gs.statcounter.com/search-engine-market-share/desktop/worldwide

[2] https://www.campaignasia.com/article/the-top-10-most-visited-southeast-asia-ecommerce-sites/468523

IP exploitation strategy in South-East Asia

Quote

Written by Marta Bettinazzi

In these changing times, we all need to find the time to prepare for the future and draft our strategy for success. This should also mean reevaluating our resources to see if we can make better use of them.

A good shift of perspective is to stop considering your intellectual property (IP) only as a cost (registration, maintenance). IP is an asset and you should learn how to make the best out of it. We will briefly look at the options that exist for exploiting intellectual property rights (IPR), then examine both the risks and the best practices to put into place in South-East Asia (SEA).

The best way to exploit your IPR depends on the kind of IP you own, but it can be summarised in two big categories: licensing and selling.man-sitting-near-fruits-723991

Selling means that you permanently transfer your IP (or better, the economic rights connected to it) to someone else. For example, you sell your patent to a bigger company that can mass-produce the invention you have patented or, more commonly, your IP is purchased as part of a merger-and-acquisition operation. In this case one company would acquire all the IPR that were part of your assets (trade marks, copyrights, patents, etc.). A famous example is the acquisition of WhatsApp by Facebook for the unimaginable price of USD 21 billion (more info here).

Licensing means that you, as an IPR owner (licensor), authorise someone to use your rights (licensee) in exchange for an agreed payment (fee or royalty).

This can allow you to expand your global presence and also ensure a source of revenue. On the other hand, the licensee can manufacture, sell, import, export, distribute and market various goods or services that they may otherwise not have had the rights to.

We can group the license agreements in three categories: Technology License Agreement; Trademark Licensing (and Franchising) Agreement; Copyright License Agreement.

Often these kinds of agreements are combined with and/or included in broader contractual settings, for example distribution contracts.

Therefore, the first step in an effective IP strategy is to review the agreements you already have in place with your partners and distributors to be sure that they include clear rules regarding the use of your IP.

In SEA it’s not uncommon for local distributors to register the IP (usually the trade marks) of their international partners under their own name. This way the local company acquires de facto an exclusive license on the product(s) of the SMEs. In fact, if the local company is the owner of the trade mark, it can prevent others from using it, including other companies authorised by the SME (the original owner of the trade mark). It might be said that you are in a marriage with your partner, and you might need an expensive and lengthy divorce (judiciary decision) to be able to leave it.

Before entering any kind of distribution agreement, give special attention to the difference between the registration of the trade mark (and IP in general) and the registration of the product itself. The latter is an administrative step needed to import a ‘new’ product into a country, but it does not ensure any protection for your IPR.

In other words, if your distributor is offering to do the product registration to allow you to import goods into the country, this does not imply that he/she is also going to help you with the registration of the trade mark or patent (or any other IP).

Keep in mind that a formal licensing agreement is possible only if the IPR you wish to license is also protected in the country or countries of interest to you. Without registering your IP in the country, you are not only unable to properly license it, but you also have no legal right to put any restriction on its use by anyone else.

Despite provisions in international treaties, courts and administrative bodies in SEA seldom extend protection to well know trade marks (see, as a reference, the famous IKEA case in Indonesia). Only Malaysia and Singapore ensure some level of protection for de facto trade marks and take into account the use of a non-registered trade mark.

On a side note, do not forget to consider registering your trade mark in local scripts as well, for example in Thailand, Malaysia, and Myanmar. This ensures complete protection for your trade mark, limiting the possibility of cheaper copycats riding on your reputation by using a transliteration of your trade mark. pink-and-white-weighing-scale-3964619

Also, note that many countries in SEA require license agreements to be registered if they are to be enforced. Some countries, like Thailand, also require the registration of trade mark licenses, others, like Vietnam, only require the registration of technology transfers.

To recap, be sure to register your IP before entering into any agreements with local partners. If this is not possible in the immediate future at least include a clause in your agreements to prevent the local company from registering your IP ‘for you’.

Technology transfer agreements can be very remunerative, but can also put your business at risk — you could be creating your own, stronger competitor. Therefore, it is advisable to either license a technology you have patented in the country where your counterpart will operate or you license something (an idea, a technology, some know-how, a recipe, etc.) that is secret. In this case, you have to be sure that your partner is bound by the same level of secrecy.

Reality is not that simple. Even if something is patented (and therefore publicly disclosed, for example in Europe) local companies might not be advanced enough to copy it, and may be interested in entering an agreement with you to acquire the know-how surrounding the patent.

This might present itself as an unpredicted and very welcome source of revenue for you, but you are running the risk of your new partner becoming your competitor in the future.

A good way to balance this issue is to bind your partner to secrecy regarding the unpatented part of the technologies.

As mentioned, technology transfers are not always encouraged by legislation in SEA and can often be subject to registration requirements. This means that if the agreement is not registered at the public office it cannot be enforced (in cases of breach or liability). Some countries have also limitations regarding the kind of technologies that can be transferred to and from their territory.

balance-balancing-boulder-close-up-133372

In short: the best strategy is always to patent all your cutting-edge technologies in as many countries as possible (including new markets like SEA); combine a good patent strategy with a high level of secrecy and be aware of local legislation.

A final thought: do not forget to prepare all your contractual documents in both English and the local language and be sure to agree and sign the local language version. Most of the courts in SEA can only accept (and understand) documents in the local language. A later translation could be not only expensive but also problematic; your counterpart could propose their own translation of the text, which could lead to endless interpretation problems.

For more information you can have a look at our guides on trade marks, patents and technology transfers, or at our country factsheets.

Do not hesitate to reach out to the Helpdesk if you have any questions on IP in SEA.

Marta Bettinazzi

IP Business Advisor

South-East Asia IPR SME Helpdesk

E: marta.bettinazzi@southeastasia-iprhelpdesk.eu

W: www.southeastasia-iprhelpdesk.eu

 

Using the Madrid System to register your trade mark in Malaysia

Quote

WRITTEN BY XUAN NGUYEN

 

On 27 September 2019, Malaysia became the 106th member of the Madrid system upon depositing its instrument of accession to the Madrid Protocol with the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO). The protocol will enter into force in Malaysia on 27 December 2019, extending the Madrid System to cover 122 countries. With the addition of Malaysia, all the countries in the South-East Asian region, except Myanmar, are now members of the Madrid System.

After the protocol comes into force, foreign companies will have two options for registering their trade marks in Malaysia, i.e. filing a trade mark application directly with Malaysia’s IP office, or filing an international trade mark application with the IP office of their home country and selecting Malaysia as one of the designated countries. Before you decide which option is more convenient for you, we would like to provide an overview of the advantages and disadvantages of the Madrid System.

What is the Madrid System?

The Madrid System, administered by WIPO, is a convenient and cost-effective solution for registering and managing trade marks worldwide. The system allows brand owners to protect their trade marks in up to 122 countries by filing one application, using one language (English, French or Spanish) and paying one set of fees.

Under the Madrid System, you need to submit an international trade mark application with the office of the home country in which refers to the national application or registration in respect of the same trade mark and select the countries where you want to register your trade mark as designated countries. After receiving the international trade mark application, your office of origin will check, certify, and then submit it to WIPO. WIPO will examine your international application in term of formalities (e.g. the applicant’s name and address, the quality of the image of mark, the classification of goods/services according to the Nice Agreement, application fees, etc.). If your application meets all the formal requirements, WIPO will record the mark in the International Register, publish it in the WIPO Gazette of International Marks and notify all the IP offices in the designated countries so that these offices can begin the substantive examination of the application at a national level in their jurisdictions. A result concerning the protection or refusal of the trade mark will be made within the time limit of 12 months or 18 months (for certain countries).

Advantages

  • Centralised and simplified registration and management system

To have your trade mark protected in multiple countries, instead of going to each country to file your trade mark application, when using the Madrid System the applicant just needs to file one international trade mark application to the office of origin, using one language and paying a single set of fees. Any amendment, such as changes (name, address, ownership, etc.), cancellation or licenses can be recorded in the International Register by simply submitting one request. Likewise, when the trade mark registration is due for renewal, the trade mark holder can renew it with WIPO in respect of all the designated countries or only some of them.

Overall, the Madrid System enables the brand owners to register and manage their trade mark portfolio in multiple countries via a simplified and convenient system.

  • Cost-effective and time-saving

By filing only one application rather than various applications in various countries, the applicant can save time and money. For example, it is not necessary to pay for translations of the documents or local agent fees which are normally incurred if an application is filed directly with the IP offices of the target countries. In many countries, the examination of trade mark applications at the national level can take up to 4 years due to backlogs. Under the Madrid system, however, the designated offices have to decide within 12 months or 18 months.

  • Subsequent designation

The Madrid System allows trade mark holders to designate additional countries alongside their existing trade mark registration. This subsequent designation procedure is very beneficial to brand owners who want to expand their business scope to new markets as they do not need to file separate applications in the new target countries.

  • Global system

With the Madrid System, you can register and manage your trade marks in up to 122 countries, representing over 80% of world trade.

Disadvantages

  • Central attack

Under the Madrid System, international registration remains dependent on the  basic application/registration in the country of origin for a period of 5 years from the date of its registration. Therefore, if the national application is rejected or withdrawn, or if the the national registration is canceled during this period, the international registration will no longer be protected unless within 3 months of the cancellation, the holder files trade mark applications for registration with the offices in each of the designated countries.

  • Refusal by national office

Laws and practices differ from country to country. It is still possible that you receive a refusal decision from some of the designated countries. In this case, the holder cannot communicate through the International Bureau but has to directly respond to and work with the national offices where the protection is rejected. In some countries, it is mandatory to use a representative agency to respond to the national office. Refusals may be avoided if, before filing, the trade mark holder identifies the countries in which rejection is likely and consults a local lawyer with expertise on the topic in order to develop a registration strategy.

Summary

Thanks to its centralised and simplified registration and management procedures, the Madrid System is a convenient solution for brand owners to protect their trade marks when doing business internationally. Nevertheless, brand owners should consult with local lawyers to develop trade mark registration strategies in certain countries where there is a high possibility of refusal by the national office.

DIOR: 3D TRADEMARK REGISTRATION CASE

2014 Christian Dior registered its J’adore perfume bottle as a 3D trademark and also an international registered trademark. Following the Madrid Agreement and the Madrid Protocol, Dior applied a territorial extension protection in China through the international bureau of WIPO. The TRAB of the SAIC rejected the application on July 13, 2015 with the reason of lack on distinctiveness. Dior filed a application for review of the refusal, but was also rejected with the same reason. After that, Dior submitted a administrative case to the court against TRAB’s decision, but failed by first and second instance. At last Dior applied for retrial to the Supreme People’s Court. On April 26, 2018 the Supreme People’s Court of China brought in a verdict that Christian Dior won the trial in the administrative dispute with the TRAB about the review of refusal, the TRAB must re-review this trademark application.

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