Online services of intellectual property offices in South-East Asia

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WRITTEN BY XUAN NGUYEN

Digitalisation has changed the way intellectual property (IP) offices operate, and made them more effective. During the Covid-19 pandemic, when many IP offices were physically closed, online systems played an essential role. Thanks to this, filing and processing services avoided disruption.

Photo source: https://pixabay.com

Photo source: https://pixabay.com

Let’s explore how the South-East Asian IP offices improved, and are still improving, their online systems and what type of online services are currently available!

  1. Brunei

To increase efficiency of the services, the Brunei Intellectual Property Office (BruIPO) has recently launched an e-filing portal for patents, trade marks, industrial designs and post-filing. For more information on how the e-filing works, check out here.

There is also an online database (here) that allows companies to search for IP rights such as patents, trade marks and industrial designs which have been registered or applied in Brunei.

  1. Cambodia

Cambodia launched an online filing system for trade mark registration in 2017. Following recent updates to reduce the need for in-person filings during the Covid-19 pandemic, the Department of Intellectual Property (DIP) has urged applicants to make use of the e-filing system as much as possible. The DIP expanded the e-filing system to include post-registration services such as renewals, the submission of affidavits of use/non-use, responses to refusals, and the appointment of a new agent.

To use the system you must create an account with the DIP and also possess a local bank account. It is only open to domestic applicants and registered IP agents. The portal can be accessed here.

In addition, a trade mark search can be conducted online via the Cambodia Trademark Database, here.

  1. Indonesia

The Indonesian Directorate General of Intellectual Property (DGIP) officially launched a new, mandatory e-filing system in 2019. Online filing has been continuously improved and covers almost all aspects of the registration process, from searching or filing to post-filing for patents, trade marks, designs and copyrights. For further information, please click here.

  1. Laos

An online system providing information and services has been developed, it was launched in February 2019 and is now operational. Although the e-filing services are not yet functioning, the trade marks database can be accessed. The Department of Intellectual Property (DIP) has begun to publish the Official Gazette for trade marks and geographical indications (GIs) on a regular basis. Detailed information can be found here.

  1. Malaysia

The Intellectual Property Corporation of Malaysia’s (MyIPO’s) offers online searches and filing services for patents, trade marks, industrial designs and GIs. This system also allows applicants to check the status of their pending IP applications. For more detailed information, please click here.

  1. Myanmar

Myanmar recently launched an e-filing system for trade marks. However, the system can only be used by IP agents. For more details, please click here.

  1. The Philippines

The e-service portal of the Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHL) is very comprehensive. It covers almost all aspects of the process, from searches or filing to post-registration steps for patents, trade marks, designs and copyrights. Further information can be found here.

  1. Singapore

The Intellectual Property Office of Singapore (IPOS) provides comprehensive IP databases. You can use the e-services portal here. It provides effective and comprehensive functions for searching, filing, amending and renewing patents, trade marks and designs. In addition, you can also download the IPOS Go app for on-the-go access to key functions for new trade mark applications, IP renewals (trade marks, patents and designs) and IP searches.

  1. Thailand

The Thai Department of Intellectual Property (DIP) introduced an e-filing system for copyright, patents and trade marks in 2016. The system, however, needs substantial improvements as it is quite unstable, and the e-filing portal is displayed in Thai only (no English version is currently available). For more information, please click here.

  1. Vietnam

The National Office of Intellectual Property of Vietnam (NOIP) launched an Online Public Service portal that covers both filing and post-filing tasks for patents, designs and trade marks. The services are open for both local agents and applicants domiciled in Vietnam. However, the NOIP now only grants account access to applicants who have already been assigned an electronic signature. Check it out here.

Conclusion

The online systems of IP offices in South-East Asia have been hugely improved over the past few years, especially during the Covid-19 pandemic. More improvements are expected in the upcoming years.

Photo source: https://pixabay.com

Photo source: https://pixabay.com

It is worth noting that the online filing systems in South-East Asian countries can only be used by local IP agents or companies with office addresses in the country in question (except for Myanmar where only agents can use the e-filing portal). If a foreign applicant does not reside or carry out their principal business in the country, a local IP agent must be appointed to work with the IP office on their behalf.

For more information about IP in South-East Asia, check out our website at https://www.southeastasia-iprhelpdesk.eu/.

The South-East Asia IP SME Helpdesk is an EU initiative that provides free, practical IP advice to European SMEs in South-East Asia. EU companies can send questions to question@southeastasia-iprhelpdesk.eu and will receive a reply within 3 working days.

Handling of Trade Secrets in South-East Asia: Focus on Thailand

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fgjTrade secrets are an excellent but often under-exploited means of IP protection for the SMEs. In Today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at trade secret protection in South-East Asia in general as well as in Thailand in particular. You will learn about general trade secret protection requirements and trends in South-East Asia and will get a closer overview of trade secret protection in Thailand in particular. 

Trade secrets are a highly valuable form of intellectual property that nearly all businesses in all industries and sectors possess. However, they are frequently overlooked by businesses, partly because there is confusion about what actually constitutes a trade secret. So what is a trade secret?

According to the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO), any confidential business information that is of considerable commercial value to businesses and that provides an enterprise with a competitive edge may be considered a trade secret. In practice, this could be:

  • sales methods
  • distribution methods
  • consumer profiles
  • advertising plans
  • pricing strategies
  • lists of suppliers and clients
  • manufacturing processes

In other words, more often than not trade secrets are the ‘know-how’ that a business builds up over time. Typically, the longer the SME is in business the more valuable its trade secrets will become, and the more its business grows the more its competitors will seek to discover this valuable working knowledge. Therefore, it is increasingly important to take steps to protect trade secrets. Continue reading “Handling of Trade Secrets in South-East Asia: Focus on Thailand” »

IP Considerations for the Automotive Industry in South-East Asia

shift-1838138_1920 In today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at IP protection in South-East Asia for the Automotive Industry, which continues to offer many business opportunities for the European SMEs. You will learn about patent protection and when it would be wiser to relay on trade secrets instead. We will also discuss how you can protect the design of your products and how to take care of your brand. 

The automotive industry in South-East Asia has exhibited robust growth over the last few years. According to the latest statistics from the ASEAN Automotive Federation, combined motor vehicle sales in 7 major ASEAN countries (Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam and Brunei) reached 3.16 million in 2016[1], almost double the sales figure in 2006. Underpinned by increasing disposable income throughout the region and increasing demand for motor vehicles South-East Asia’s automotive market is expected to continue to grow rapidly. This also means that there will be promising business opportunities for European SMEs whose expertise and technology are especially sought after.

Taking into account the constant innovation that is at the forefront of the automotive industry, the importance of intellectual property as well as its protection and enforcement, are undeniable. Thus, when exploring the possibility of investing or expanding into the South-East Asian markets, European SMEs should be aware of the IP risks that they will face when operating in this region, in particular with respect to the new technologies and the ability to protect these technologies from local competitors. A comprehensive IP strategy is needed for succeeding in South-east Asia’s markets. Continue reading “IP Considerations for the Automotive Industry in South-East Asia” »

IP Protection in the Food & Beverages Industry in Thailand

shutterstock_173260598In today’s blog post we are taking a closer look to IP protection in Thai food and beverage industry, which is growing fast and attracting more and more European SMEs. You’ll learn more about brand protection in Thailand and how to protect your unique product packaging. The article will also discuss trade secrets and geographical indications. 

Thailand’s rapidly growing food & beverage industry is one of the biggest contributors to nation’s economy, contributing about 23% of the country’s GDP. Known as the ‘food basket of Asia’, Thailand is one of the Asia’s largest producers and exporters of food, with food exports amounting to 23.5 billion EUR in 2015.[1] Given Thai government’s commitment to positioning the country as a global food innovation hub, Thailand’s F&B industry has recently become very attractive for European SMEs.

Propelled by increasing dispensable income, Thailand’s domestic food and beverages market looks promising for the European SMEs. The country’s rapidly growing urban middle class constitutes a consumer base that is increasingly health-conscious, pays attention to the nutrition value of the food, but at the same time is increasingly eager to purchase processed and packaged foods and, especially the urban youth, is willing to try out new flavors and exotic F&B products. The busy lifestyle of urban youth is favoring ready-to-eat meals, snack foods and convenience products.

As the spending power of the upper-middle class is increasing, there is also greater demand for imported premium products, which offers many business opportunities for the European SMEs.

At the same time, together with rapid economic growth, counterfeiting in food products has also increased dramatically in recent years. Thus, the EU SMEs should take steps to ensure that their IP rights are protected, when selling their food products to Thailand, especially as neglecting to register IP rights in Thailand could easily end SMEs’ business endeavor in the country. Continue reading “IP Protection in the Food & Beverages Industry in Thailand” »

Cleantech in Thailand: Some IP Considerations for the Rapidly Developing Market

clean-techIn today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at the IP protection in Cleantech industry in Thailand, which has in recent years attracted the attention of European SMEs as the market is offering many promising opportunities.

As Thailand is one of the leaders in South-East Asia region in terms of renewable energy solutions, especially connected to solar power, but also to biomass and hydropower, its market attracts cleantech companies from over the world. Given Thai government’s ambitious plan of achieving a 25% energy consumption from renewable energy sources by 2021[1], and the fact Thailand’s energy consumption is predicted to jump by 75% over next two decades[2], Thai cleantech market is expected to offer promising opportunities for European SMEs whose top-notch technology is especially sought after.

Because of the abundance of renewable energy sources, including sun, hydropower, and biomass, the country could become a true renewable energy powerhouse. Cleantech companies focused on solar energy, biosphere alternative energy systems, energy conservation and efficiency can find promising business opportunities in Thailand because these areas are also receiving the lion’s share of Thai government’s investments on renewable energy.

European cleantech companies should, however, pay attention to protecting their IP rights when planning their business strategy for the Thai market, because IP infringements are still relatively common in the country. Furthermore, cleantech industry tends to have high level of collaboration and licensing which make IP ownership the centerpiece of the business strategy.  Well-managed IP is often a key factor for business success and neglecting to register IP rights in Thailand could easily end SMEs’ business endeavor in the country. Thus, a robust and integrated IPR strategy is needed, when entering Thailand’s market. Continue reading “Cleantech in Thailand: Some IP Considerations for the Rapidly Developing Market” »