Bad Faith Trade Mark Registrations in China

Prior trade mark registrations, also called ‘bad-faith registrations’, are a significant problem that many European companies encounter in China. This process commonly involves a Chinese company first registering the trade mark of a foreign company in China with the express intention of selling it back to the foreign company at an inflated price. Finding out that a Chinese company has registered a bad faith trade mark is one of the biggest complaints of European Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) trying to enter the Chinese market. These prior registrations can limit the foreign company’s freedom to operate by restricting its ability to enter the China market or even to source goods from China.

As an example, a Scandinavian SME used a Chinese factory to make its goods for export. The Chinese supplier registered the Scandinavian company’s trade mark in China and engaged China’s customs to intercept export goods bearing the trade mark, thereby disrupting the Scandinavian company’s business. Continue reading “Bad Faith Trade Mark Registrations in China” »

Back to the Basics Series: Protecting Trade Secrets in China Part II

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ConfidentialLast week we explored Chinese laws on trade secrets and discussed some measures that the SMEs can take to protect their trade secrets. This week we get more practical and discuss how the SMEs can use non-disclosure agreements and confidentiality agreements to protect their trade secrets. We will also take a look at the measures the SMEs can take, once the trade secrets have been illegally revealed.

Nearly all businesses in all industries and sectors possess trade secrets. Trade secrets are a valuable and highly useful form of intellectual property right (IPR). As the name suggests however, trade secrets are a non-registrable form of intellectual property; they only enjoy legal protection as long as they are not disclosed publically. It is therefore crucial to prevent your trade secrets from being divulged in the first place. Once out, there is usually very little you can do about it. This concluding piece of a two-part article describes measures you can take to help ensure trade secrets aren’t lost through employees and third parties as well as options available to you should your secrets be disclosed. Check the last issue of Eurobiz for part I of this series which outlined how to identify a trade secret and the physical, technical and contractual barriers you can put in place to protect them.  Continue reading “Back to the Basics Series: Protecting Trade Secrets in China Part II” »

Bodega Branding: The How, What, When, and Why of Wine IPR Protection

wine label-03In our last article we sang a song of growth and prosperity for the wine industry in China, fueled by the staggering figures of industry growth and Chinese wine consumption in recent years. This was tempered somewhat by the somewhat tragic tales of the relatively unimpeded development of a parasitic counterfeiting industry which continues to sap the profits of wine producers, damage reputations, and in some cases harm consumers in the process[1].

Today however we’ll be striking a more positive note, and looking at how producers and distributors can utilise the established IPR protection framework maintained by the People’s Republic of China and defend the reputation of their products.

Continue reading “Bodega Branding: The How, What, When, and Why of Wine IPR Protection” »

Alibaba Revises Taobao IPR Enforcement System

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Carrying on with the theme from the China IPR SME Helpdesk’s last blog post on e-commerce brand protection, Alibaba Group have made revisions to Taobao’s enforcement policies which took effect last month.

Continue reading “Alibaba Revises Taobao IPR Enforcement System” »