IP Protection in the Food & Beverages Industry in Thailand

shutterstock_173260598In today’s blog post we are taking a closer look to IP protection in Thai food and beverage industry, which is growing fast and attracting more and more European SMEs. You’ll learn more about brand protection in Thailand and how to protect your unique product packaging. The article will also discuss trade secrets and geographical indications. 

Thailand’s rapidly growing food & beverage industry is one of the biggest contributors to nation’s economy, contributing about 23% of the country’s GDP. Known as the ‘food basket of Asia’, Thailand is one of the Asia’s largest producers and exporters of food, with food exports amounting to 23.5 billion EUR in 2015.[1] Given Thai government’s commitment to positioning the country as a global food innovation hub, Thailand’s F&B industry has recently become very attractive for European SMEs.

Propelled by increasing dispensable income, Thailand’s domestic food and beverages market looks promising for the European SMEs. The country’s rapidly growing urban middle class constitutes a consumer base that is increasingly health-conscious, pays attention to the nutrition value of the food, but at the same time is increasingly eager to purchase processed and packaged foods and, especially the urban youth, is willing to try out new flavors and exotic F&B products. The busy lifestyle of urban youth is favoring ready-to-eat meals, snack foods and convenience products.

As the spending power of the upper-middle class is increasing, there is also greater demand for imported premium products, which offers many business opportunities for the European SMEs.

At the same time, together with rapid economic growth, counterfeiting in food products has also increased dramatically in recent years. Thus, the EU SMEs should take steps to ensure that their IP rights are protected, when selling their food products to Thailand, especially as neglecting to register IP rights in Thailand could easily end SMEs’ business endeavor in the country. Continue reading “IP Protection in the Food & Beverages Industry in Thailand” »

IP Considerations in South-East Asia for the Food and Beverages Industry

gi-pictureIn today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at the IP protection in the food and beverage sector in South-East Asia, a sector that has recently seen a  lot of attention from the European SMEs as it offers many promising business opportunities. In this blog post you’ll learn more about branding, protecting your product packaging and protecting your authentic products from specific geographical region with Geographical Indications. 

South-East Asia is home to more than 600 million people and it is the third largest market in the world, with ten countries integrated in a common market under the ASEAN Economic Community. South-East Asia also has high economic growth between 3-10 percent per annum, which is driven primarily by consumption, due to the large population and a growing middle-class.

With higher disposable incomes and increasing health-consciousness, today’s consumers in South-East Asia are seeking healthier food and beverage choices. They tend to look for higher quality products, including those imported from overseas. This has opened up a range of attractive opportunities for European as European products are generally considered to be of high quality. However, diversity and regulatory affairs can sometimes be challenging in various local markets. South-East Asia has a wide mix of cultures, religions, customs, culinary preferences, and demographics that greatly impacts the F&B sector. For example, Indonesia and Malaysia have large Muslim populations, which could provide many business opportunities for halal-certified F&B products manufactured in Europe. Conversely, there are limited opportunities for imported wines and spirits in Indonesia and Malaysia due to the religious limitations on alcohol consumption.

European SMEs should, however, not forget to pay attention to protecting their IP, because despite the fact that most South-East Asian countries have good IP laws and regulations in place, IP infringements are relatively commonplace throughout South-East Asia. Well-managed IP is often a key factor for business success and neglecting these rights could be costly. Thus, a comprehensive IPR strategy is needed, when entering South-East Asia’s markets. Continue reading “IP Considerations in South-East Asia for the Food and Beverages Industry” »

Cleantech in Thailand: Some IP Considerations for the Rapidly Developing Market

clean-techIn today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at the IP protection in Cleantech industry in Thailand, which has in recent years attracted the attention of European SMEs as the market is offering many promising opportunities.

As Thailand is one of the leaders in South-East Asia region in terms of renewable energy solutions, especially connected to solar power, but also to biomass and hydropower, its market attracts cleantech companies from over the world. Given Thai government’s ambitious plan of achieving a 25% energy consumption from renewable energy sources by 2021[1], and the fact Thailand’s energy consumption is predicted to jump by 75% over next two decades[2], Thai cleantech market is expected to offer promising opportunities for European SMEs whose top-notch technology is especially sought after.

Because of the abundance of renewable energy sources, including sun, hydropower, and biomass, the country could become a true renewable energy powerhouse. Cleantech companies focused on solar energy, biosphere alternative energy systems, energy conservation and efficiency can find promising business opportunities in Thailand because these areas are also receiving the lion’s share of Thai government’s investments on renewable energy.

European cleantech companies should, however, pay attention to protecting their IP rights when planning their business strategy for the Thai market, because IP infringements are still relatively common in the country. Furthermore, cleantech industry tends to have high level of collaboration and licensing which make IP ownership the centerpiece of the business strategy.  Well-managed IP is often a key factor for business success and neglecting to register IP rights in Thailand could easily end SMEs’ business endeavor in the country. Thus, a robust and integrated IPR strategy is needed, when entering Thailand’s market. Continue reading “Cleantech in Thailand: Some IP Considerations for the Rapidly Developing Market” »

The Next Vintage: The Future of Wine Anti-Counterfeiting; Advice from our Experts

Corks smallToday’s blog post will sum up our Wine series that we have been running for the past couple of weeks and discusses the future of IP protection in the wine industry.

Wine counterfeiting in China is at a critical stage for the European wine industry. In recent years we have had a taste of what Chinese consumption means to the European producers, with over a quarter of a billion litres of European wine consumed annually by what represents only a fraction of the potential market in China. As the market moves from commodity and gift wines to drinking ‘table’ wine, so do the counterfeiters, flooding supermarkets and restaurants with wines bearing (often validly registered) appellation marks which have no connection to the liquid inside the bottle.

Chinese palates are at a crucial developmental stage, and exposure to poor quality counterfeits of European wine not only damages profits, but also poisons the reputation of European producers in the Chinese marketplace. Competition with domestic producers is already fierce, and Europe’s wine industry can no longer afford to stand by and let this threat go unchallenged.

As we saw in our ‘Terroir IPR’ articles, producers do not stand alone in the fight against counterfeiting, and national agencies such as INAO, as well as regional regulatory bodies such as the CIVB are in working to register GIs and combat the most obvious fraudsters. These two organisations are a minority however, and their pockets alone are not deep enough to fund a comprehensive campaign. Without support of more organisations, and ultimately the producers they serve, they can only do so much to slow the poisonous effects of counterfeiting in China. Continue reading “The Next Vintage: The Future of Wine Anti-Counterfeiting; Advice from our Experts” »

IP Protection Strategies in Indonesia for the Logistics and Transportation Industry

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Logistics3Indonesia’s logistics and transportation industry is growing rapidly due to the strong economic development of the country and gradual increase in domestic demand fueled by the rise of the country’s middle class.  Opportunities for logistics providers also continue to expand thanks to the strong growth in Indonesia’s e-commerce sector.  

However, transportation costs in Indonesia are still significantly higher than in many of its neighboring countries. This is reasonably due to the geographic challenges that Indonesia faces as a conglomerate of thousands of islands composing the country, and also due to Indonesia’s strict logistics and transportation policies regulating import and export of goods. For example, the requirement that ships with imported cargo are obliged to call at particular ports, which means, for example in the case of agricultural imports, that they all would need to go through Surabaya port before being shipped to the other markets where they are needed1  causing an inevitable congestion of shipments rather than a procedure to streamline the logistics. 

On the other hand, as an emerging and fast growing economy, the industry is expected to offer in the near future many lucrative business opportunities to European SMEs specialised in logistics, as also recently outlined by Indonesia’s President including ambitious expenditure plans for building new roads, airports and railways and to develop a modern maritime transport system together with better regulations2.    

European logistics and transportation SMEs wishing to enter the Indonesian market need to keep in mind that despite improvements in Indonesia’s IP laws and regulations, counterfeiting and other IP infringements are still  commonplace in Indonesia and thus robust IP strategies are needed to grow their business in Indonesia.  

Continue reading “IP Protection Strategies in Indonesia for the Logistics and Transportation Industry” »