IPR Protection in China’s Textile Industry

sweatshirts-428607_1920Two weeks ago we were discussing IP protection in South-East Asia’s textile industry, in today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at the IP protection in China’s textile industry, which is still offering many promising business opportunities to European Businesses. The blog post will offer advice to textile producers, to the producers of yarns and fabrics as well as to the producers of textile machinery. In this blog post you can get further information on trade mark, patent, copyright and trade secret protection. 

China’s textile industry is both an opportunity and threat to European businesses. It is a major market for those supplying production technologies and a key supply base for textiles and finished goods. However, foreign technologies and brands that are not adequately protected often fall victim to infringement by Chinese competitors. This article addresses IP issues across subsectors of the textile industry, including textile machinery, yarns and specialty fabrics, finished fabrics and brand apparel & accessories. The areas of IP most relevant to the above sectors will be discussed, as well as smaller IP issues specifically affecting makers of brand apparel & accessories.

Trade Marks Protect Your Brand

Trade marks provide protection against use of identical or similar marks on similar goods. China uses the ‘first-to-file’ system, meaning that companies may lose legal protection in China and take the risk of infringing others’ trademark if the same or similar mark has already been registered in China by someone else. It currently takes two-three years from application to registration of a trademark in China, providing no opposition is filed against the application upon publication.

Because China uses the ‘first-to-file’ system, it is common for unscrupulous parties to register other’s trade marks first. It can be a difficult and expensive process to cancel, oppose or buy back a trademark that has already been registered. It is not uncommon that import agents or distributors register trade marks on behalf of the principal. It is recommended that the trademark is either registered in the name of the principal or transferred back to the principal to avoid later disputes. In addition to registering the trademark in the original language, it is advisable to register a distinctive Chinese language trademark, even if this is not the primary mark used. Without a well-promoted Chinese mark, the market may create a Chinese nickname for a product, and this nickname may be registered by unscrupulous parties to exploit the reputation of your brand. Continue reading “IPR Protection in China’s Textile Industry” »

IP Protection in South-East Asia for the Textile Industry

towels-1511875_1920In today’s blog post, we are taking a closer look at IP protection in South-East Asia’s  textile industry, which is developing fast and offering many opportunities to European SMEs. You will learn how to protect your newest fabrics, your textile machinery or your brand in South-East Asia. 

Textile industry in South-East Asia offers many promising business opportunities to European SMEs as garments are one of ASEAN’s largest export articles and textile industry is still growing in the majority of South-East Asian countries with fastest growth rates registered in Vietnam and Cambodia. Furthermore, Thailand that has traditionally been strong in textile manufacturing has now set its sights on becoming a fashion hub for the ASEAN region as its textile and garment exports to other ASEAN countries have been steadily growing for the past few years. Similarly, Indonesian government is committed to preparing several incentives in a bid to boost the textile sector and making Indonesia one of the top five global textile exporters.[1]

South-East Asia has been the production hub for many European companies that would then export apparel and accessories back to the European Market. At the same time South-East Asia also offers market opportunities for European products as European design is becoming more well-known in the region.  Singapore for example has become Asia’s second fashion capital, offering a variety of high-end international brands.[2] As Asian consumers are becoming more affluent and cities like Bangkok or Kuala Lumpur are becoming more established in the fashion world, there will be more opportunities to European SMEs in the region.

At the same time, South-East Asia’s textile industry is both an opportunity and threat to European businesses. It can be a major market for those supplying production technologies and on one of the key supply bases for textiles and finished goods. However, foreign technologies and brands that are not adequately protected often fall victim to counterfeiting and other IP violations that are still commonplace throughout the whole South-East Asia. Continue reading “IP Protection in South-East Asia for the Textile Industry” »