The Importance of Patent Ownership in Employment Contracts in Indonesia: A Case Study

patent-without backgroundToday’s blog post explains the importance of identifying patent ownership in employment contracts. The blog post gives a brief overview of patent protection in Indonesia followed by a case study demonstrating the need to be clear on patent ownership.

Patents in Indonesia

A patent is a right granted to the owner of an invention to prevent others from making, using, importing or selling the invention without his permission. A patent may be obtained for a product or a process that gives a new technical solution to a problem or a new method of doing things, the composition of a new product, or a technical improvement on how certain objects work.

Indonesia adopts a ‘first-to–file’ patent system, meaning that the first person to file an IP right in the Indonesian jurisdiction will own that right once the application is granted. Two types of patent are recognized in Indonesia – ‘Standard Patents’ (for products and processes) and ‘Simple Patents’ (for products only). The process for obtaining a Simple Patent is supposed to be shorter, however, there is a reduced term of protection in this case, as indicated below. For all applications, applicants need to specify the scope of the protection sought and to explain how to work the invention by means of technical descriptions and drawings. Continue reading “The Importance of Patent Ownership in Employment Contracts in Indonesia: A Case Study” »

The Importance of Voluntary Copyright Registration in Malaysia: A Case Study

shutterstock_176603774In today’s blog post we will be taking a closer look at the Copyright registration in Malaysia. The article demonstrates through case study the importance of voluntary copyright registration in Malaysia 

Copyright in Malaysia

Copyright in Malaysia protects literary, artistic, musical and dramatic works. Copyright also protects sound recordings, published editions, films, broadcasts and performer’s rights. Copyright ownership could be held either by the author, his employer or the person who commissions the work.

It must be noted that an author retains the right to have his name identified as the author of the work based on what is called a moral right. The author also has the moral right against the distortion, mutilation or other modification of his or her work. Ownership of copyright entails an exclusive right to commercially exploit the work. A classic example of commercializing a copyrighted work is the distribution of copies of the work for sale. We can see this in traditional commerce such as books and compact discs. As an intangible property, copyright can also be licensed or assigned to third parties for royalties. When licensing, it is important to determine the extent of copyright use that is permitted.

In Malaysia, copyright exists as soon as the original work is created and belongs to the creator of the work automatically. There is no formal requirement for the work to be registered in order for copyright to be claimed or recognized, however a copyright owner may voluntarily register their copyright in Malaysia. Registration is still advisable for foreign SMEs as the registration can be extremely useful in enforcement proceedings as evidence of your ownership. To claim copyright ownership (i.e. to forewarn infringement), a notice with the symbol © may also be placed in/on the work followed by the name of the owner and the year of first publication. Continue reading “The Importance of Voluntary Copyright Registration in Malaysia: A Case Study” »

IP Enforcement Litigation in Taiwan: Some Basics

courtToday’s blog post has been kindly shared with us by our external experts Mr. John Eastwood and Ms. Eve Chen from Eiger. In this article, Mr. Eastwood and Ms. Chen give a basic overview of IP enforcement litigation in Taiwan. You will learn more about the options you have in Taiwan to take action against the infringements of your IP rights and how to prepare to defend your rights. The article first appeared on Eiger website.  

INTRODUCTION

Rights holders looking at Asia-Pacific enforcement budgets often have to make hard decisions about where to take action. Although Taiwan’s population is small (about 22 million), it has a big role in financing massive overseas infringement in China and Southeast Asia and it is still a major manufacturer of fake optical-media products (CDs, DVDs, CD-ROMs), auto parts, and high-tech products involving infringements of patents and misappropriation of trade secrets. Fortunately, the Taiwan court system offers some solid options to rights holders who want to take action.

PREPARING FOR ACTION

Rights holders need to prepare evidence and documents establishing their rights and the facts of infringement before they take action, as the Taiwan police, prosecutors and judges involved with authorizing raid actions are sticklers for details. As a preliminary matter in trademark and copyright cases, it is important to assemble copies of the Taiwan trademark certificates (front and back sides) and any supporting documentation needed to establish copyright protection. Continue reading “IP Enforcement Litigation in Taiwan: Some Basics” »

IP Protection in the Philippines for the Environmental Technologies Industry

MC900437625In today’s blog post we take a closer look at how European SMEs can protect the IP rights of their environmental technologies in the Philippines. This sector has recently started to boom and offers many promising business opportunities to European SMEs. You will hear more about patent protection and trade mark protection. We will also offer some tips on how to enforce your rights. 

European SMEs that are working on high-tech sustainable solutions for environmental problems find the Philippines quite a promising market. The country that is highly vulnerable to climate change faces many environmental challenges including deforestation, costal degradation, air and water pollution as well as issues arising from waste disposal, just to mention the few most pressing issues. At the same time, the government of the Philippines is committed to looking for solutions, including sustainable high-tech solutions to the most pressing environmental issues, as it is annually allocating over 16 million EUR for climate change adaptation and mitigation funding[1].

European SMEs offering technological solutions to energy efficiency issues, environmentally sustainable transportation, sustainable infrastructure or waste management sectors, are expected to find many promising business opportunities in the Philippines, as these are the sectors that the government of the Philippines is highlighting as the priority sectors in its National Framework Strategy on Climate Change 2010-2022.[2]

European environmental technology providers wishing to enter the Philippines’ market need to keep in mind that despite the recent improvements in the Philippines’ IP laws and regulations, counterfeiting and other IP infringements are still commonplace in the country and thus a robust IP strategy is needed to grow their business in the Philippines. Continue reading “IP Protection in the Philippines for the Environmental Technologies Industry” »

IP Protection in Malaysia for the Medical Device and Healthcare Industries

insurance-1991276_1920In today’s blog post we are taking a closer look at IP protection in the medical device and healthcare industries in Malaysia. You will learn more about the importance of patents in medical device industry and the various patents that can be applied in Malaysia as well as about the importance of brand protection. 

As one of the main pillars of Malaysia’s economy, supported by numerous governmental initiatives, medical device and healthcare industry is growing fast in Malaysia, making the country one of the top destinations for medical tourism. Healthcare industry in Malaysia is expected to grow close to 30% per year up to 2020[1] and as Malaysian government is creating various incentives for foreign investments, this sector is expected to offer many promising business opportunities for European SMEs.

Malaysia has a large ageing population with rising disposable income and European SMEs can find business opportunities in many sectors including elderly care. As digitalization is still one of the challenges in Malaysia’s medical device and healthcare sector and since the government is encouraging the implementation of the E-Health Strategy, European high-tech solutions are much welcome in Malaysia. Furthermore, as Malaysia’s population is becoming increasingly affluent, consumers pay a lot of attention to wellness and disease preventions, meaning that there is growing market for medical devices that are used to self-monitor one’s health condition like blood glucose and pressure monitors[2].

European SMEs wishing to do business in Malaysia’s healthcare and medical device sector should pay attention to protecting their intellectual property rights, because even though Malaysia’s IP regulations have improved over the past years, counterfeiting and other IP violations are still commonplace in the country. At the same time, neglecting to protect IP rights can often quickly end European SMEs’ business endeavors in South-East Asia. Continue reading “IP Protection in Malaysia for the Medical Device and Healthcare Industries” »